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  • POODLE for TLS

    Part 3 of 3 in the Series — Poodle
    The POODLE attack on SSL 3.0 has now been extended to some implementations of TLS. POODLE for TLS can be tracked through CVE-2014-8730. Adam Langley states that “TLS’s padding is a subset of SSLv3’s padding so, technically, you could use an SSLv3 decoding function with TLS and it would still work fine. It wouldn’t check the padding bytes but that wouldn’t cause

        in Alerts, SSL
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  • Lucky Thirteen TLS Attack

    Nadhem AlFardan and Kenny Paterson of the Information Security Group at Royal Holloway, University of London, announced a new TLS/DTLS attack called Lucky Thirteen.

        in SSL, SSL Deployment
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  • Summarization of CRIME Attack on SSL

    I’ve written a few blogs on CRIME, but now that Juliano Rizzo and Thai Duong have presented CRIME at Ekoparty 2012, I thought a summary is due. CRIME is short for “Compression Ratio Info-Leak Made Easy.” In their presentation, Rizzo and Duong reminded us that HTTPS provides confidentiality, integrity and authenticity; however, CRIME decrypts portions of an HTTPS message, such

        in Secure Browsing, SSL
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  • Testing Your SSL Server for CRIME

    We still have to wait for later this week when Juliano Rizzo and Thai Duong will present their CRIME SSL/TLS attack at Ekoparty Security Conference. Regardless, we now know that the attack is based on the implementation of TLS compression or SPDY (pronounced “speedy”). CRIME uses the vulnerability that there is information leakage when data is compressed prior to encryption.

        in Secure Browsing, SSL, SSL Deployment
    0
  • Summarization of CRIME Attack on SSL

    I’ve written a few blogs on CRIME, but now that Juliano Rizzo and Thai Duong have presented CRIME at Ekoparty 2012, I thought a summary is due. CRIME is short for “Compression Ratio Info-Leak Made Easy.” In their presentation, Rizzo and Duong reminded us that HTTPS provides confidentiality, integrity and authenticity; however, CRIME decrypts portions of an HTTPS message, such

        in Secure Browsing, SSL
    0
  • Testing Your SSL Server for CRIME

    We still have to wait for later this week when Juliano Rizzo and Thai Duong will present their CRIME SSL/TLS attack at Ekoparty Security Conference. Regardless, we now know that the attack is based on the implementation of TLS compression or SPDY (pronounced “speedy”). CRIME uses the vulnerability that there is information leakage when data is compressed prior to encryption.

        in Secure Browsing, SSL, SSL Deployment
    0
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