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  • SSL Session Resume

    Yngve Pettersen of Opera has written a great article on SSL Session Resume. The SSL session resumption feature in the SSL/TLS protocol allows multiple connections to use the same negotiated secret key data to calculate encryption keys for the connection. This allows a secure connection to be re-established very quickly with no loss of security, since the data exchanged securely

        in SSL Deployment
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  • SSL False Start Performance Results

    As a follow-up to ‘Google is speeding up SSL’, Google has reported very favorable SSL False Start performance results. In summary, False Start reduces the latency of a SSL handshake by 30 percent. In addition, Google has implemented False Start into Chrome so that it is basically 100 percent backwards-compatible. Google Chrome is the only browser implemented with False Start.

        in Secure Browsing, SSL, Technical
    0
  • HTTPS Performance Tuning

    Following up my last post, “SSL is not computationally expensive anymore,” I noticed Google is still using a 1024-bit RSA certificate for Gmail. I did some digging and confirmed that the performance hit of using a 2048-bit RSA key is about five times that of 1024-bit key. So this could create a 5-10 percent load on CPU and network overhead

        in SSL Deployment, Technical
    0
  • SSL is not computationally expensive anymore

    A recurring theme in this blog is proper SSL deployment . One of the push backs that we hear is that SSL brings a lot of overhead, so it only gets deployed when absolutely necessary. Well, that myth was busted about a year ago when Google switched of Gmail to HTTPS. An article by Adam Langley of Google

        in SSL Deployment, Technical
    0
  • HTTPS Performance Tuning

    Following up my last post, “SSL is not computationally expensive anymore,” I noticed Google is still using a 1024-bit RSA certificate for Gmail. I did some digging and confirmed that the performance hit of using a 2048-bit RSA key is about five times that of 1024-bit key. So this could create a 5-10 percent load on CPU and network overhead

        in SSL Deployment, Technical
    0
  • SSL is not computationally expensive anymore

    A recurring theme in this blog is proper SSL deployment . One of the push backs that we hear is that SSL brings a lot of overhead, so it only gets deployed when absolutely necessary. Well, that myth was busted about a year ago when Google switched of Gmail to HTTPS. An article by Adam Langley of Google

        in SSL Deployment, Technical
    0
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