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  • Entrust withdraws from CA/B Forum

    Entrust has a long history with the CA/Browser Forum. We are one of its founding members, and have worked closely with it since its founding. Sadly, we have had to leave the Forum along with nearly 40% of its membership including other companies such as IdenTrust, Network Solutions, RIM, RSA and T-Systems. Even worse, this comes at a time when

        in General, Secure Browsing, SSL
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  • US Court Decision is Good News for Banking Customers

    Blogmaster Note: This was originally posted on July 17, 2012 to ComputerWorld UK’s Security Spotlight Blog. US ruling has implications for UK over bank’s liability Thefts from a construction company in Sanford, Maine might be the catalyst for much-needed improvements to banking security. The US First Circuit Court of Appeals reversed a decision that said that a bank was not

        in Fraud
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  • Alan Turing Notes on Cryptography Released

    Are there any insights left to be wrung from the code breaker's papers? Chris Vallance of the BBC reports that GCHQ has released some of Alan Turing’s papers on the theory of code breaking. They’re not on display at the National Archives at Kew. I’ve checked the web pages of the Archives and GCHQ, and there is as of my writing nothing up there, yet. The two papers are titled, The Applications of Probability to Crypt” and Paper on the Statistics of Repetitions. They discuss the use of mathematics to cryptanalysis. This might seem a bit obvious now, but at the time cryptanalysis was largely done by smart people and not by machines. A code-breaker was more likely someone who was good at solving complex crossword puzzles than working with numbers. It was unusual to bring in someone like Turing to a cryptology lab.

        in Encryption, Technical
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  • There Weren’t Really Chinese Backdoors in Military Chips

    Blogmaster Note: This was originally posted on July 12, 2012 to ComputerWorld UK’s Security Spotlight Blog. What happened and unsolicited advice In March, Cambridge researcher Sergei Skorobogatov and Quo Vadis Labs researcher Christopher Woods put up a draft paper on a cool new technique they used to ‘disable all the security’a security-enabled chip. It sat there until around May 28,

        in Identity Assurance, Technical
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  • Alan Turing Notes on Cryptography Released

    Are there any insights left to be wrung from the code breaker's papers? Chris Vallance of the BBC reports that GCHQ has released some of Alan Turing’s papers on the theory of code breaking. They’re not on display at the National Archives at Kew. I’ve checked the web pages of the Archives and GCHQ, and there is as of my writing nothing up there, yet. The two papers are titled, The Applications of Probability to Crypt” and Paper on the Statistics of Repetitions. They discuss the use of mathematics to cryptanalysis. This might seem a bit obvious now, but at the time cryptanalysis was largely done by smart people and not by machines. A code-breaker was more likely someone who was good at solving complex crossword puzzles than working with numbers. It was unusual to bring in someone like Turing to a cryptology lab.

        in Encryption, Technical
    0
  • There Weren’t Really Chinese Backdoors in Military Chips

    Blogmaster Note: This was originally posted on July 12, 2012 to ComputerWorld UK’s Security Spotlight Blog. What happened and unsolicited advice In March, Cambridge researcher Sergei Skorobogatov and Quo Vadis Labs researcher Christopher Woods put up a draft paper on a cool new technique they used to ‘disable all the security’a security-enabled chip. It sat there until around May 28,

        in Identity Assurance, Technical
    0
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