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  • Entrust President and CEO Bill Conner Shares his Thoughts on Sen. Rockefeller’s Letter to the Fortune 500

    Sen. Jay Rockefeller, D-W.Va., who serves as Chairman of the U.S. Committee on Commerce, Science & Transportation, has asked the key questions yet again: Are companies using best practices to protect themselves and their customers’ security? Are companies maintaining their cybersecurity efforts and vigilance on a regular basis, and updating their systems to reflect emerging threats? What concerns me most, however,

        in General
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  • Nitol Malware — Leveraging Dynamic DNS for Nefarious Gains

    A malicious botnet called ‘Nitol’ was interrupted by Microsoft on Sept. 13. ‘Nitol’ was using a Dynamic DNS to enable the infected bot computers to communicate with the hacker’s command and control server. For background, it is possible to serve a website from a home computer, but the difficulty is that your home Internet service provider provides a constantly changing

        in Malware
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  • Testing Your SSL Server for CRIME

    We still have to wait for later this week when Juliano Rizzo and Thai Duong will present their CRIME SSL/TLS attack at Ekoparty Security Conference. Regardless, we now know that the attack is based on the implementation of TLS compression or SPDY (pronounced “speedy”). CRIME uses the vulnerability that there is information leakage when data is compressed prior to encryption.

        in Secure Browsing, SSL, SSL Deployment
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  • Stopping CRIME Attacks

    This article by Dan Goodin appears to cover the most facts about the CRIME attack on SSL/TLS. It answers my first question about what the acronym means; CRIME is short for “Compression Ratio Info-Leak Made Easy.” It also confirms the attack is performed when the communication uses TLS compression. My understanding is that TLS compression is used in SPDY, which

        in Secure Browsing, SSL
    0
  • Testing Your SSL Server for CRIME

    We still have to wait for later this week when Juliano Rizzo and Thai Duong will present their CRIME SSL/TLS attack at Ekoparty Security Conference. Regardless, we now know that the attack is based on the implementation of TLS compression or SPDY (pronounced “speedy”). CRIME uses the vulnerability that there is information leakage when data is compressed prior to encryption.

        in Secure Browsing, SSL, SSL Deployment
    0
  • Stopping CRIME Attacks

    This article by Dan Goodin appears to cover the most facts about the CRIME attack on SSL/TLS. It answers my first question about what the acronym means; CRIME is short for “Compression Ratio Info-Leak Made Easy.” It also confirms the attack is performed when the communication uses TLS compression. My understanding is that TLS compression is used in SPDY, which

        in Secure Browsing, SSL
    0
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